Being a Better Writer: Empty Details

Today’s topic is a bit of the inverse of the one I wrote last week. I didn’t intend for this at first—in fact I had no plans for an inverse article when I sat down last Monday; the appearance of this one is entirely coincidence brought about by something I was reading.

But coincidence aside, it’s a worthwhile topic to discuss, because it’s something that can crop up all to easily in fiction … even among experienced authors. For example, while I tend to notice empty details occurring pretty regularly among young writers, I also occasionally find them in finished works as well (one such notice being the result of today’s topic). Given all the time that I’ve spent on this blog discussing the importance of little details and how we can feed things out to our readers, I feel that it’s important, then, to discuss the inverse: empty details.

Empty details are the result of trying to add too much detail to one’s writing. It can stem from a number of sources. Maybe the author in question feels that the isn’t enough going on and tries to liven a scene up by adding more detail. Maybe they’re worried that their dialogue seems sparse (this is one area where this issue seems to crop up most often). Or maybe they’re just trying to reach an arbitrary word count for the day.

It could be any number of reasons. Well, the end result is that they fill their scene with these empty details.

Right, I’ve used that term a couple of times now. What do I mean by it?

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Colony is a Hit, Guys!

Well, it’s been three weeks, and in that time, Colony has continued to be an absolute hit. At this point, it’s no stretch to call it my most successful title yet. since its release, it’s sold on average two copies per day!

And it keeps selling!

And that’s just sales. Colony is on Kindle Unlimited, and I’m also seeing a number of reads there. How many? Enough that I’m seeing an average of 720 pages read per day. One day hit almost 3,000 pages read.

Yeah, this blows Unusual Events out of the water. As it does One Drink and Dead Silver. None of them are even coming close to this level of success.

Of course, sales mean nothing if the readers aren’t happy, but thankfully I can report that this is not the case. So far, Colony is sitting at a glorious 4.8 Star rating on Amazon, and solid 5 Star rating on Goodreads, and with some pretty glowing reviews to match.

Colony is making a mark on Sci-Fi. A small one in the larger scheme of things, but with clear space to grow.

But there’s only one direction for Colony to go from here. And that’s UP! Which leaves us with only one final question:

Have you read Colony yet?